A History Of Jazz in Harlem

A History Of Jazz in Harlem

Ah, the “Roaring 20s,” an era of dramatic social and political change in Western culture. A time where freedom extended toward African American communities, leading them to migrate north to Harlem, New York City, which quickly became the world’s largest African American community in 1920. This created the Harlem Renaissance, a rebirth of hope for the community through cultural bursts of activity. The Harlem Renaissance, otherwise known as the rebirth of Harlem, brought the most artistic and intelligent beings to the Harlem Neighborhood and carried the novel and now infamous genre of Jazz music to this spirited and historically-rich area. Read more

Why you should be in New York for Thanksgiving

Why you should be in New York for Thanksgiving

Every November, the US celebrates Thanksgiving Day, a national holiday when families come together to spend time, share food and enjoy parades. Celebrating Thanksgiving in New York City is a favorite occasion for many locals but it’s also a wonderful opportunity for tourists to learn more about American culture. It is actually one of the big six holidays of the year! What will you do that day? Here are some tips and activities suggestions for you to make the best of it! Read more

Beer in October, NYC Style

Beer in October, NYC Style

You never really need an excuse to drink more beer, but this year’s NYC Oktoberfest is giving you some anyway! Enjoy it!

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Visit Queens during the US Open

The United States Open Tennis Championships is a hard court tennis tournament. It is the modern version of one of the oldest tennis championships in the world, the U.S. National Championship, for which men’s singles was first contested in 1881. Since 1987, the US Open has been chronologically the fourth and final tennis major comprising the Grand Slam each year; the other three, in chronological order, are the Australian Open, the French Open and Wimbledon.

The 2017 United States Open has just begun!

Credits: pexels.com
Credits: pexels.com

The US Open is held annually, starting on the last Monday in August, and lasting for two weeks into September, with the middle weekend coinciding with the Labor Day holiday. The main tournament consists of five event championships: men’s and women’s singles, men’s and women’s doubles, and mixed doubles, with additional tournaments for senior, junior, and wheelchair players. You can follow the results HERE!

The tournament, which serves up the world’s best tennis players in our backyard, is celebrating its 20th year at Arthur Ashe Stadium in Queens. The venue, named for the tennis champion Arthur Ashe, has evolved a great deal since opening in 1997.

2 options to visit Queens while you’re enjoying the tennis tournament!

Credits: wikimedia
Credits: wikimedia

The Queens is the easternmost and largest in area of the five boroughs of New York City. It is geographically adjacent to the borough of Brooklyn at the southwestern end of Long Island, and to Nassau County further east on Long Island; in addition, Queens shares water borders with the boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx.

The Triboro tour from Hip Hop to Hipsters (with BBQ Lunch)

Your New York City adventure begins! Visit the three largest boroughs of New York City including Queens! Grab a seat on our climate-controlled coach to The Bronx, often referred to as the “Boogie-Down Bronx” and the only borough of New York City that is attached to mainland USA. Explore the South Bronx known for its influence on Latin music and greatly recognized for its impact on global pop culture with the emergence of Hip-Hop, Breakdance and Urban Graffiti.

(Photo by Harlem Spirituals)

See the new Yankee Stadium and The Grand Concourse; known for its many iconic Art Deco buildings. Head on over to Queens; New York’s 2nd largest and most ethnically diverse borough. See Astoria with its exciting local art corridor of murals and stop at Socrates Sculpture Park; the only NYC metropolitan area dedicated to large scale sculpture and art installations in an outdoor environment. See Long Island City’s expanding waterfront community with one of the highest concentration of art galleries, art institutions, and studio space in New York City.

Credits: Wikimedia

(Photo by Wikimedia)

Finally: Brooklyn! Synonymous with all things trendy and artisanal, Brooklyn abounds with energy and diverse cultures. Stop in Williamsburg, the “hipster capital of the world” and a great place to “People Watch”. Spend some time exploring its cool and laid back atmosphere with unique cafés and local shops.

Credits: pxhere

(Photo by pxhere)

Indulge in an authentic down-home BBQ lunch in Downtown Brooklyn then see DUMBO a unique neighborhood nestled between the Manhattan and Brooklyn bridges.

If you want to book this tour with us, CLICK HERE !

Our 2 hours Champagne & Limo Private Tour

Credits: pxhere
Credits: pxhere

It’s a chic way to visit Queens ! Experience the City’s lights in VIP style! Sit back, enjoy a complimentary glass of champagne and enjoy the sights. Your tour begins when we pick up your party at your hotel location in your very own private stretch limousine.

Credits: pxhere

(Photo by pxhere)

Our deluxe private vehicles with tour guide will pick up guests from their lobby and treat them to customized itineraries including tours of Manhattan, Harlem, the Bronx, Brooklyn and Queens. Travelers can select the neighborhood and theme of the tour. Private tours are available in English, French, Spanish, Italian, German and Portuguese. If you want to book this tour with us, CLICK HERE !

If you are interested in finding more to do in New York City, search through our complete range of tours, attractions and activities. We can also tailor-make programs specifically to match your desires and budgets. Harlem Spirituals is the ideal one-stop-shop to simplify your planning! Find more information on www.harlemspirituals.com or contact us at info@harlemspirituals.com.

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Things To Do for Labor Day in New York

Things To Do for Labor Day in New York

Labor Day in the United States is a public holiday celebrated on the first Monday in September. It honors the American labor movement and the contributions that workers have made to the strength, prosperity, laws and well-being of the country. Sadly, it is also considered the unofficial end of summer in the United States. A lot of New Yorkers are going to enjoy their last recreation before going back to work ! So if you are in New York during this time, here are some activities you could do!

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